SSEN Transmission and Balfour Beatty donate Easter eggs to make a difference

Staff from SSEN Transmission’s project team in Fort William, along with their main contractor Balfour Beatty, took time away from upgrading the local network to donate 80 Easter eggs to patients and families at Fort William Health Centre and members of the lunch club which is held at Caol Community Centre

The team of 115 is currently working on SSEN Transmission’s project to upgrade the overhead line between Fort Augustus and Fort William and since the work started last spring, a number of the project staff have got to know more about the local communities where they are working; it was this feeling of community spirit that kick-started the idea of collecting Easter eggs and donating them to two groups that really make a difference in the local area.

Pat Howe, SSEN Transmission’s project manager, explained that he and his colleagues wanted to bring a smile to the patients and families at the Fort William Health Centre, especially if they were going through a difficult time. He said:

"For a lot of people Easter is a time when families get together, relax on the sofa and share a few chocolate eggs but we all know that when you’re in hospital that’s maybe not possible for a whole host of reasons.

"We wanted to show the patients and families at Fort William Health Centre that we were thinking of them, and although Easter eggs may seem small in the grand scale of things, we were hoping that our donation could maybe take everyone’s minds away from their hospital beds for a short time."

Amy Fraser, who is a Civil Engineer with Balfour Beatty, said: "At Balfour Beatty, we are committed to delivering significant, positive benefit for the communities in which we operate. Having delivered the Easter eggs to families at Fort William Health Centre and members of the Lunch Club, I was delighted to see first-hand the difference these gestures can make.

"We hope that everyone enjoyed eating them as much as we enjoyed delivering them."

Connie Grant, Specialist Mental Health Occupational Therapist at the centre said:  

"The day the eggs came was fantastic as the children’s nurse was able to hand the eggs to children who were in for cancer treatment, we also gave eggs to children who have a parent getting treatment for cancer. There were eggs given to children who attend physiotherapy, psychology, leaning disability services, speech and language services as well as children who live with a parent or guardian with a mental health diagnosis.

"It was really nice for NHS staff and families to see the children being able to have a bit of enjoyment in times that can often be difficult."

To learn more about the project, please visit www.ssen-transmission.co.uk/projects/fort-augustus-fort-william.

The above photo shows (l-r) Amy Fraser, Lee Manghan and Leanne Morton (all from Balfour Beatty), Pat Howe (SSEN Transmission), Connie Grant (Fort William Health Centre) and Caroline Gordon (Dementia Link Worker with Alzheimer’s Scotland).

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Van on rural road

Scottish and Southern Electricity Networks

We're responsible for maintaining the electricity networks supplying over 3.7 million homes and businesses across central southern England and north of the Central Belt of Scotland. We own one electricity transmission network and two electricity distribution networks, comprising 106,000 substations and 130,000 km of overhead lines and underground cables across one third of the UK. Our first priority is to provide a safe and reliable supply of electricity to the communities we serve in Scotland and England.

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